About us

Who we are and what we do

History

The Army Flying Museum is located at Middle Wallop, close to Andover, in Hampshire. The Museum tells the story of British Army Flying from the early days of military ballooning to the modern Army Air Corps. The collection was started in 1946 at RAF Andover but later moved to Middle Wallop and first opened to the public in 1974.

In 1984, the Museum moved from a location “behind the wire” to a new, purpose-build hangar which is located on the edge of an active airfield. The Museum has since been extended twice more and now comprises two large aircraft halls (the Prince Michael of Kent Hall and the Hayward Hall) a learning centre, a 1940s house display, a play park and conference facilities.

The collection covers the five main branches of Army Aviation: Royal Engineers (1878 – 1912), The Royal Flying Corps (1912-1918), Air Observation Post Squadrons (1941 – 1957), the Glider Pilot Regiment (1942 – 1957) and the current Army Air Corps (1957- to date). Over 40 aircraft can be seen in the Museum. These range from a First World War biplane to a HueyCobra attack helicopter plus an example of every Allied glider used operationally during the Second World War. 

Highlights of the collection include a Sopwith Pup – an example of a single-seat fighter introduced in 1916 -and a Lynx helicopter which broke the world speed record in 1972 by achieving an average speed of 199.92 miles per hour (321.74 km per hour) in a 100km closed circuit. It was also the first British helicopter ever to complete a barrel roll.